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ALL ABOUT HERDING: SHETLAND SHEEPDOGS


– [Announcer] Dogumentary
TV, producing the best breed documentaries on YouTube. (dog barking) (upbeat country music) – The Shetland Sheepdog
is a great herding dog because it’s very active,
has very strong drive, and is a loyal companion. My name is JoAnn Borchard. I’ve had three Shetland Sheepdogs and I’ve shown them in agility
and obedience and rally and I decided to try herding with my second Shetland Sheepdog, Chip. Hey, Robin.
– Good morning. – Guess what I got. – Looks like we have a new puppy. – We do. – Who is this? – [JoAnn] This is Rigby. – Hi Rigby, and how old is Rigby? – [JoAnn] Rigby’s nine months old. – Perfect age, you know, and
we’ve done so well with Chip, your older dog, and I’m
really happy to see that as a herding breed owner,
and anybody, as you know, that has a herding
breed, bringing them out to do an instinct test to see
if they have that instinct and desire to want to herd
can help you with any sport you’re going to do with your dog or just be a better partner with you. So, glad to see you’re out here with your nine month old puppy. And let’s go try him out on some sheep. (upbeat country music) – My name is Michele Illes. I started with On the Lamb with Maya, my current Shetland Sheepdog. I noticed she had a strong drive. She was circling objects. She was circling my son. So I thought I’d take her to On the Lamb to get her instinct tested and sure enough it was a very strong drive that Maya had that that’s what started the whole game. I have four Shetland Sheepdogs and all four have done various activities such as herding, agility, obedience, and even pet therapy. – When I went to buy a new Sheltie, I wanted a dog that was confident, that would look me in the eye, that was not fearless but absolutely ready to get to a new situation because I knew that herding would be
interesting for them at least. I went to On the Lamb Herding with Chip, even though he had already done herding with some other trainers,
because I had heard that Robin Elliott was
an excellent trainer and I thought I’d give it a try and see if our personalities matched. (exciting music) The Shetland Sheepdog came
from the Shetland Islands and it was a combination, at first, of many different mixed breeds. Some, maybe possibly of Spitz origin. It was a general farm dog. Later on, about the start
of the 20th century, people began to cross them with Collies and the modern Shetland
Sheepdog, or Sheltie, was born. – The colors of the Shetland
Sheepdog come in various forms, such as a sable color which is
a brownish and whitish color, a blue merle which is considered
white, black and some gray, there’s a tri which is
brown, white and black, and the sable, which is the most common
Shetland Sheepdog, is the main color that you see. – The Shetland Sheepdog is a small dog that should range between 13 inches and 16 inches at the shoulder. Weight should be proportionate to the dog. The eyes of the Shetland
Sheepdog can be brown, and if it is a blue merle,
they also can be blue or a blue and a brown eye, but most eyes of the Shetland Sheepdog are brown. (upbeat music) – The Shetland Sheepdog
is one of the sixth most intelligent breeds there are today. They’re considered a loose-eyed breed, unlike the Border Collie
where they focus the sheep with their eyes, Shelties tend
to push the sheep from behind and drive the sheep that way. They don’t have that strong stare that a Border Collie may have, hence the name, why they are
called a loose-eyed breed. Shelties are known to herd any livestock from chickens to ducks to geese to cows. I’ve even had mine herd my kids. So, once they have that
strong instinct drive, they pretty much can herd anything. (upbeat country music) – The Shetland Sheepdog
is a happy, energetic, lively dog and his temperament
generally is really good. It’s a really good family dog. If you have a Shetland
Sheepdog, he loves you. He will do anything he can within the power of what
he can do to please you. The Shetland Sheepdog
makes a wonderful pet. In fact, many people do nothing with their Shetland
Sheepdogs but have them as family pets and
companions for the children. – They’re a very active breed. They do need someplace to move around in. I don’t know if it would
be a favorable breed for someone that might live in an apartment-type environment. They do need to have some space and also the only downside might be because they do bark. Sometimes that’s good because
they alert people to them. Sometimes it can be more of a nuisance. But, with proper training, the
barking can be taken care of, at less, I mean, make it less noticeable. (upbeat country music) They want to have a job. Whether… It can be any job, such as
even a pet therapy-type job, it could be taking your Shetland Sheepdog to an obedience class to learn new tricks or basic obedience, it could
be a job to learn sheep, especially if they have a
high drive, or even agility. There’s so many things
nowadays that you can do with dogs in general that it’s endless and to have a family
with a Shetland Sheepdog get involved in things,
it’s good for the family and it’s also good for the dog. – [JoAnn] The Shetland Sheepdog
is generally a healthy dog that lives about 14 years and has very few health problems. – I’m gonna say, when
purchasing a Shetland Sheepdog, as an owner, you would have to make sure the lineage of where this
puppy or dog came from to ensure that it is
free of major illnesses. Some of the things that do come up are epilepsy, eye disorders, hip disorders. Not very common in the Shetland Sheepdogs, but they’re there. And as a responsible dog
owner you would want to check on those things before
purchasing a Shetland Sheepdog. My dog is Maya. She will be eight years old. She’s currently seven. She’ll be eight years old next month. She’s what we call, she
came from what we call a singleton puppy, meaning she was the only puppy in the litter. There were no littermates whatsoever. And when I was looking for
a new Shetland Sheepdog, I was looking for some dog
that had some independence, somewhat outgoing, not real fearful, and I think I got more than
I bargained for with my dog. She’s very outgoing, very independent to the point where, if
she doesn’t feel like she wants to do something,
she won’t do it. But she’s very friendly with any stranger, loves my son, she loves
me, very affectionate and I wouldn’t trade her for the world. – I have two Shetland Sheepdogs. One is an eight-year old blue
merle by the name of Chip. Chip is an agility
champion and Chip is also an advanced herding dog. The reason Chip went into herding was because we needed a job for him to do and he, although he loved agility, he loves it, he likes obedience, he really enjoys moving sheep around. My newest dog is nine month old Rigby. He’s a tri-colored dog and Rigby is just learning
to be a Shetland Sheepdog. He’s learning basic commands
and today we found out whether he would herd sheep. He’s also in a little puppy agility class. We’re kind of letting him grow up and see what he’s going to turn out to be. One of the things that my
Shetland Sheepdog, Chip, is working on is the newest,
one of the newest things that the American Kennel
Club is giving titles to, and that is the trick dog. So, Chip has always enjoyed doing tricks and amusing the grandchildren with funny little things that he can do, but we have some specific things, some specific tricks that
the AKC would like to see and that would be carrying something or jumping through a hoop
or going to a special place or just sitting. Yeah, I think the Shetland Sheepdog is an ideal companion. The Shetland Sheepdog wants
to do whatever you want to do. And if you want to just sit
there, he’ll just sit there. But if you want to go out and try agility, he’s all for it. – I agree. I find the Shetland Sheepdog
one of the best breeds for me. I’ve had many other breeds
that I had in the past from Dachshunds to even
a Border Collie but when it comes to loyalty and
warm fuzzies from my heart, the Shetland Sheepdog is it. – You know, I find the Shetland Sheepdog is just a fun dog to own. You can do anything with them and they’re always enthusiastic and even though they really are a working dog, they have a funny side to them. – I agree. (upbeat country music)

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Comments
  • Dogumentary. For a one person made channel, the amount of information and passion in all your videos is really inspiring. Theyre all so professionally made I can't believe a studio didnt make em. The very best of luck. Keep up the Great work.

  • To make things clear I am a dog person. I have been following channels that give me information over dogs. So far dogumentary TV is the best. Most importantly I like the way the videos are detailed and give almost 99.9 % information over a particular dog breed. I am a big fan of the maker of these videos specially his flawless voice-overs

  • The sheltie kicks ass in agility. Would like to see program on smooth collies. They are on the UK's vulnerable breeds list.

  • I was waiting for this breed dogumentary 😀 got one Sheltie a few years ago, on my country they are a little uncommon, everybody thinks he is a young Collie. They are smart, energetic, super active breed. Cheers to this channel, excellent work as always m/.

  • Another great video Zeke! Love the way you film. My brother owns a sheltie and from what I've personally observed over the years (nearing a decade now) I've found the breed to be:
    Intelligent
    Eager to please
    Loves to chase and herd – anything that moves –
    Vocal (I've found my brother's dog not only barking at people and other dogs but birds on the roof, lawnmowers, other strange noises. Also when over stimulated/excited. Never for no reason though)
    Wary of strangers
    Adores their family
    Gentle and sweet-natured
    Needing frequent brushing especially when blowing their coats

  • Yay finally! Shelties are my breed, fell in love with the breed 12-13 years ago and last summer I finally got my tricolored male Sam ❤️ he’s amazing, so much will to please, he never says no to work. But he’s also gentle and very loving. We’re gonna train and compete in agility – he loves being active!

  • I would love if you could do a komondor video. 🙂 looking to buy one but there isnt much out there about them and i wont buy unless im prepared.

  • I had a collie and a sheltie. Whenever I went to the dog park, my sheltie would go out and herd the dogs, and my collie would go out and herd him back to us. It was pretty hilarious.

  • When my Sheltie was younger she would get bored with a trick after practicing only a few times and start adding on to it herself. I actually had to make her go through her entire trick routine before she'd even take one treat unless it was a brand new trick. She also made her own obstacle course from toys in the backyard because she was out there by herself for about 15 minutes. They are scary smart!

  • Could you perhaps do; Living with an Australian cattledog?
    Thank you Zeke, for a wonderful channel 🙂

  • Wish the interview had been done with a breeder instead of just 2 owners who'd only had 2 shelties each.
    A breeder has so much more knowledge and can tell you more things than what you read in a regular "dog-breeds-book" and what these two ladies are saying, which is bascially what you can read in a book.
    The video is beautiful made, not complaining about that, it's just the credibility is higher with a breeder or someone who's had the breed from more years and tried more and different things with their dogs.

  • I once bought a puppy from a horse rancher in Payette Idaho who used only the Sheltie to work with the horses because they are quick persistent GENTLE herders. He had tried Border Collies and Aussie breeds but they nip as part of their herding and two were kicked to death because a horse is not a sheep. Border Collie nip, Shetland Sheepdogs nag. Thus, the sharp persistent barking.

  • my sheltie murphey used to heard us when we were kids. god damn i miss that dog, i used to play traveling soccer down at the oval, one game he ran out on the field and chased the ball while the game was being played lol

  • A Sheltie will be my next dog breed to own after my current German Shepherd passes.
    I spent a lot of time around my cousin and her Shelties (She competed in obedience with her dogs) and during those times spent, I fell in love with their fun personality, intelligence and loyalty. Great little dogs to take anywhere.

  • I'm currently on my 4th Sheltie, (a tri-color named Auggie Doggie). LOL, he loves "herding" the grandkids when they visit and has that "Border Collie" stare when he "herds" his toy ball in his spare time.

  • I am very much a cat person and very much a dog person. Currently I have not owned a dog but have my two cats and I also am very much an exotic animal person, I have two bearded dragons and a leopard gecko, I have had fish, and I love snakes! I love rodents, I've had a past hamster and a current one. I have had a rabbit, and I'm looking into another one! Also me and my family are looking for a dog that is easy to travel with, and since Shelties are small, we can fit that into our life when we have less pets! Currently we don't have the time space or money to care for more animals but we will look in to one in the future!

  • My one sheltie like the herd me around the house. Like he’ll bite my pants and growl and I just laugh and go in the opposite direction. He growls at me when I don’t follow his directions, but he lets me cuddle him all the time

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