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Borax Water Wagon Axle Hounds | Tapered Mortise & Tenons | Engels Coach


Well, last week we got the patterns made for these hounds now we need to transfer the patterns to some ash planks, and we’ll get these hounds cut out and assembled. Now, if you’ve been watching very long on this site you notice I don’t do a whole lot of explaining and a lot of detail, and talking. Most of you are pretty accomplished craftsmen and got a whole lot going on, and in a lot of ways, more than I do. Well, when I did the Borax wagons, I was under such a time crunch that I didn’t have a lot of time to go into a lot of detail. So, my hope in this water wagon is that the details makes things a little more clear. If it’s too much, just let me know in the comments, but I’m going to just let ‘er run and let you watch. Well, I get to see if this revamped mortiser is is worth a hoot. I’m going to run a 3/4 inch bit on this. These quarter by three metal straps that encase the ends of the axle hounds is where the tongue will attach and it will pivot on this queen bolt. So next week we’ll go rom here. Thanks for watching!

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Comments
  • The video, the content, the detail, the method are all brilliant, as usual, but, I for one definitely missed the sound of your "My Masters Voice" and your excellent, on the button commentary. Keep 'er lit Bro!

  • The way you wrapped those metal bars over the hounds is just pure poetry. They fit like shoes. I can help thinking that you are going to be found fitting disk brakes to those wagon wheel hubs in a forthcoming video!

  • Great video… less the opening and closing shots!
    Here in Maine I have grown tired of winter, I ready to start complaining about summer. Lol

  • Thanks Dave for allowing us to peek over your shoulder. Another wonderful Friday Night with the Wheelwright.

  • I don't know how many of your viewers will ever have occasion to order a wagon, but we sure know where to go if we need one!

  • Great work Dave. You have a good eye and feel with that planer. This video of the borax water wagon reminds me a lot of the or borax wagons that you made. Is this wagon going to be attached behind the borax wagons?

  • I see you're getting dusted with what the hubby calls "God's Dandruff". Hope you're staying warm…windchill is -30*F here!

  • Do you like Projects under pressure, Mr E.?
    Why are they called, 'Hounds'?
    Like the plane on it's side: Used to get a rap if I forgot!

  • you did good! I always enjoy watching a skilled tradesman while at his work. Thank you for what you do.

  • Another great video you amaze me drilling across a timber from hole to hole and it lines up nice watchun thanks

  • I can't believe the video is over already. Watching you work is like eating candy, it's always gone too soon.

  • Thank you for another masterful video. Good to see the morticer is working as planned. Also nice to see you place the hand plane on it's side unlike so many who just 'plonk' it down on the bench. I still have the jack plane my father gave to me in 1960's, mind you it has had a couple of new blades since then 🙂

  • I noticed you using a rather antique looking jack plane and it made me wonder if some of your tools were passed down from your father. What sort of work did you father do and did his chosen vocation influence you to become the craftsman that you are today?

  • Some really beautiful planks of wood. For me, no need for too much detail, it sort of explains itself. Thanks

  • That Ash is. SO NICE.!!!! I'd love to have some, but the expense of transportation kills that idea. Got a new stump for my anvil. My neighbor had some big hemlock fir and Cedar trees cut down, but the guy cut them into 28"-35" rounds😭😭…..
    They are so full of water I had a heck of a time loading a 28" round less than 3' tall into my. Jeep. Great video Dave. !!!!!!

  • Just watching a craftsman like you is more than enough. Your skills are unique and fill a special niche.

  • I always enjoy watching you work my four year old grandson was watching this with me and said at the seven minute area that you were making a giant wooden pair of pliers lol

  • You do make it look easy but my arms ache just thinking about the effort involved when I stop to consider it all. Nice work on the videography too.

  • Does watching yourself moving in fast forward ever fool you into feeling young again for a couple of seconds?

  • You should hire an apprentice to teach your skills to so someone is able to carry on this art otherwise it will become a truly lost art and no one knowing how to do it.

  • Another great video. I really like the videos just the way they are. Thank you for your continual post I really look forward to them.

  • at around 17:45 to  18:30 where you hammering the rivet's even with the Surface, did you taper the holes? Thank you for sharing your Knowledge! Like your Video's! Keep up the good work! Greeting's from Germany! 🙂

  • Watching that Mortiser with that Machinist style table on it… Man. That is poetry. Had to rewatch that segment..
    PS. I changed my name from Christopher Neely on Here to Chris Neely AKA GOAT: there are a lot of young college kids that can find me better that way. Check out my Third Story on my TMODcast Playlist. For a laugh.
    About misbehaving on a High School Field Trip to DollyWood in East Tennessee. Start at 24:20 to get
    The Story: Part Six. Page TWO!
    <iframe width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/SNqYcCb9lwk?start=1457" frameborder="0" allow="accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen></iframe>

  • I love your videos super interested in doing with hands. I was a service plumber that took pride in leaving the house the way it was. Take stuff apart that nobody wanted, when necessary to open walls clean square openings ect.
    But time is money sometimes the cost involved with labor determined what gets done.
    It looks like that is your shop/ business, is it near enough to your house that you could pop in & out relative ease? When i was healthy i worked till the calls were done..sometimes 10 or 11pm. I think if I had a shop close to my house i would pass my time putzing rather than cursing there's nothing on tv..

  • You said you were pressed for time on this project. I have absolutely no idea on time with your projects, do you have to quote prices on these builds, is there competition?? What was the time limit on this?? No employees?

  • I'm trying to figure out the business end.. I'm guessing this project is months long. So this project has to figure 100% of expenses for building rent, utilities,labor, health insurance, heat and whatever else is needed. That would give you an hourly break even number, = if you just worked to pay bills never close a day, got hurt, power outages ext ..
    Then you could figure how much you need to charge to make a profit, take a vacation,replace the roof, repair/replace equipment. Love running the #s almost as much as doing the work.

  • I know in plumbing some companies had charges for using equipment even a charge for using blades, drilling a hole, jackhammer,torch ext..
    Whit your shop do you have a breakdown on costs for using your machines or do you incorporate it on your labor?? Do you pop into the shop & work when you're bored at home? Thats why i asked how close you live.. Thanks again enjoy your videos

  • I prefer the minimalist approach- too many of the You Tube guys seem to think they are talking to children and spend 50% of their time explaining the obvious. Terminology is interesting, and probably has ancient roots- I wonder what the origin of "felloes" and "axle hounds" is.

  • I was once a craftsman and then I went into Information Technology work for my last 12 years of work before retirement. Watching these videos makes me regret in many ways those 12 years where often it seemed I did nothing or produced nothing of importance.

  • less talking – please don't ever change that. far too many people spend far too much time talking, repetitively describing in unnecessarily painstaking detail what they are in any case about to do. walk, don't talk.

  • Absolutely beautiful
    That old shear with the long handle on it works really well thats pretty thick metal

  • Your videos are like a time machine, I wish you where my woodshop teacher. God bless you and your family, Aloha

  • I appreciate that you don't make a "how to" video out of this but you use footage that explains everything with a little bit of information put in where you need it, very soothing channel to watch and keep up the good work.

  • Dave, your videos are top notch! Keep up the great work. Love your channel! As a teen I visited my grandmother's place in Auberry, CA. Her neighbor was a wheelwright, I was captivated by the art.

  • your kind of talent can be copyed but never duplicated.if i were younger and lived in montana,i would work for nothing just to be able to watch you.

  • Sir, your work is very intuitive, you are performing clear actions that could be understood by every enthusiast of the trade. Words will just spoil the video.
    Keep up the good work and Thank you for your videos

  • Even the nuts are lined up perfectly. What god – i mean, you – put together shall not ever taken apart by human…

  • Those of us watch and know how to do stuff,,, weld, machine work, wood work, we don’t need an explanation.
    You already ,graciously give up some of your valuable time to record these processes.
    It is un believable the amount of work, and yet we know how much work it is!
    Thank you sir for your time.

  • When you were on that shear it looks like you could use a little more of moms good old home cooking to help you get the job done a little easier.

  • Been making my way through a bunch of your videos. Glad I found your channel. Really great info and videos.

  • How do you drilling and lathe millwork without cutting oil?

    It’s neat watching all your videos how much I DO know yet I also see I have a long way to go yet. You really inspire me to use advanced tools. Thank you

  • Reminds me of the days of watching Bob Ross paint. Always a treat and each time, I learn something new. Thank you for allowing us to be in your shop and watch a true craftsman at work! Stunning!

  • That is some fine work. That is a lot of wood to put through a band saw alone (I have been a woodworker for over 50 years) and then to fit the steel to fit it, now that takes talent and patience. Great work, excellent video.

  • Yes, Thank You – to you, dear sir, a True Craftsman/Artist.
    I was a cowboy in my youth, feeding cattle in Wyoming at the foot of the Bridger Wilderness with a 4 horse team and sled. From there to heavy construction Boilermaker, building Power Generators Nuke to coal fired.
    I really appreciate your step by step builds – from this water wagon (WOW!) to the International covered wagon like I used to haul manure to build temp irrigation dams long ago with a two horse team.
    I'm 3/4 of a century old now, so my heaviest work is firewood in the sumber.
    Thank you for preserving a valid and precious part of our Republic's history for all to see! – Old Blooo

  • keep up the good work and filming thank you for your effort coming from retired farrier in So IL i enjoy shop time you sir are a fine craftsman, journeyman, apreciate your work

  • Yes I agree Thank you for letting us watch. I also appreciate your videos not having loud stupid music, most of the time I don't even hear it.
    Some videos I turn off the sound, then I don't hear the conversation he has with the camera. Your editing is super, I will be watch a lot
    of your stuff. Again Thanks

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